//
you're reading...
Borneo, Sarawak, Sarawak Economy

Nokia, Western Digital, Sony and IBM using parts made in Sarawak!

DID you know that companies such as Nokia, Western Digital, Sony and IBM use parts for their gadgets that are made in Sarawak?

Isn’t it amazing that Sarawak has a part to play in the running of high-tech gadgets produced by these global giants?

This is all made possible by the Taiyo Yuden Group’s factory in the Sama Jaya Free Industrial Zone!

The factory, which is among the largest for the company with over 10,000 employees worldwide, manufactures ceramic capacitors and related products for the electronics industry.

The Sama Jaya factory employs about 3,600 locals, who make up about 99 per cent of its workforce.

And some 30 per cent of the upper levels of employment are also locals.

Last year, the company paid more than RM67 million in salary to staff at the Sama Jaya plant! Wow!

The plant is now in the midst of recruiting several hundred non-skilled workers as well as engineers. Yup — more jobs for Sarawakians.

The company also runs training programmes with Politeknik Kuching, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas) and Universiti Tenaga Nasional to ensure locals have the skills to work in its plant.

Because of the attractive tax incentives, political stability and security that the company has found in Sarawak, Taiyo Yuden will transfer the production of more high-end components from its headquarters in Japan to the State in a move to increase overseas plant utilisation.

This will involve changing current production methods where new machinery will be installed to cater for the production of high-end and sophisticated components.

Taiyo Yuden will send its staff for training in Japan to equip them with the essential knowledge and expertise to enable a smooth transfer of technology and upgrade the skills of the current workforce.

The company’s monthly sales volume is between RM50 million and RM60 million, and its net sales for the fiscal year ending March 2011 totaled a whopping US$2.58 billion.

The company’s managing director (Sarawak) Koichi Ando pointed out that Sarawak is a safe place to invest due to political stability.

“Sarawak is a good (place to invest). We have tax incentive and a very conducive environment for investment,” he is quoted as saying.

He added that he felt safe living in Sarawak and our local food is also a positive factor!

Taiyo Yuden is the world’s third largest manufacturer of multi-layer ceramic capacitors and the second largest in Japan.

Yes, it is indeed a major international player and yes, the company intends to invest more in Sarawak!

Let the facts speak for themselves.

Great stuff. Real transformation and not just passing change.

The report from New Straits Times:

Drawn by incentives, stability

KUCHING: Attractive tax incentives, political stability, security and tasty local food were the reasons the Taiyo Yuden Group set up a plant in Sarawak.

The plant makes electronic parts and its clients include Nokia, Western Digital, Sony amd IBM.

Its managing director (Sarawak) Koichi Ando said Taiyo Yuden would continue its high end electronic parts production by improving its products through the creation of even smaller electronics parts with higher capacity.

The plant is now in the midst of recruiting several hundred non-skilled workers to add to its existing work force of 3,600. Apart from non-skilled workers, the plant will also be recruiting engineers.

“At present, the plant has 3,600 workers and 99.9 per cent of them are locals.”

Taiyo Yuden (Sarawak) was set up in 1994.

How the Borneo Post reported it:

‘Taiyo Yuden among key players to help state achieve high income status’

KUCHING: Assistant Minister of Industrial Development (Investment and Promotion) Julaihi Narawi believes Taiyo Yuden will be among the key players to help the state achieve a high income society status.

A manufacturer of ceramic capacitors and related products for the electronics industry, the company which operates in Sama Jaya Free Industrial Zone, is among the largest in the Taiyo Yuden Group, and employs about 3,600 locals who make up about 99 per cent of its workforce.

About 30 per cent of the locals are in the ‘upper level’ of employment.

“The company (Taiyo Yuden) like other companies in Sama Jaya and Samalaju Industrial Estate is important to the state to diversify the economic activities.

“And this is one of the ways to enable the people earn higher income, which I believe Taiyo Yuden is among the players to help us,” Julaihi told a media conference yesterday.

Julaihi, together with Assistant Minister of Industrial Estates Development Datuk Peter Nansian, had earlier attended the company’s briefing conducted by managing director and chief executive officer Koichi Ando.

Both were briefed on the operations of the company and its industrial training programmes with Politeknik Kuching, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas) and Universiti Tenaga Nasional.

Julaihi, who is also Assistant Rural Development Minister, also told the conference that the company’s monthly sales volume was between RM50 and RM60 million, and the net sales for fiscal year ending March 2011 totalled US$2.58 billion.

Among others, Taiyo Yuden’s clients include Nokia, Sony and Samsung and other electronic industries.

Last year, the company paid more than RM67 million in salaries for staff working at the plant here.

The company will transfer the production of more high-end components from the headquarters in Japan to Sarawak in a move to increase overseas plant utilisation.

This will include changing current production methods where new machinery will be employed to cater for the production of high-end and sophisticated components.

To enable the smooth transfer of technology and upgrade the skills of its current workforce, Taiyo Yuden will send its staff for training in Japan to equip them with the essential knowledge and expertise for the new methodology.

Meanwhile, Taiyo Yuden will not resort to retrenchment of workers.

Koichi, through an interpreter, said even during the last economic crisis, none of its workers was retrenched.

“We don’t retrench our staff,” he said.

He also said the state was a safe place to invest due to political stability.

“Sarawak is good (place to invest), we have tax incentive and a very conducive environment for investment,” he said.

He also said he felt safe to live here, and among the attractions was the local food which he had adapted well to.

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: